Home Up Contents Search

Transportation Demand Management
 

Home
News & Notice
COG Members
COG Budget
Grants / Funding
Transportation
CTR
Census 2010
NEWSLETTER
YVCOG Calendar
Title VI
Useful Links

 

 

 

 

Transportation Demand Management (TDM)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) is a term applied to a broad range of strategies that are primarily intended to reduce and reshape demand (use) of the transportation systems.

The information below is provided courtesy of the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) and YVCOG. Explore Every Avenue


What is TDM?

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) is a term applied to a broad range of strategies that are primarily intended to reduce and reshape demand (use) of the transportation system.

As used here, TDM means demand-side strategies (as opposed to supply-side strategies such as new lane construction) which are intended to affect how, if, and when the transportation system is used. Some of these strategies also contain elements of Transportation Systems Management (TSM), which are strategies implemented to maximize efficient operations of the transportation system.

Some TDM measures have been in use for years, such as the promotion of carpooling, which began during World War II. Broader implementation of TDM began during the 1970s and 1980s, often stimulated by problems related to our heavy reliance on foreign energy sources. More recently, increasing congestion, decreasing state and federal transportation funding, and concerns over related issues such as air quality have resulted in increasing attention to TDM as an alternative to building more roads and highways.


TDM and Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) Legislation

Have you ever noticed that most of the automobiles on our highways have only one person in them, and that's the driver! As more and more people begin to drive, we are beginning to see an increase in air pollution and traffic congestion. The Washington State Legislature is aware of these two problems, and in an effort to reduce air pollution, traffic congestion and energy consumption, they passed the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) Law. This law is a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measure that requires the State's largest counties, and cities within those counties, to develop and adopt CTR Plans by ordinances. The CTR law was amended by the Commute Trip Reduction Efficiency Act of 2006. This legislation defined the CTR affected area as the shared contiguous Urban Growth Area (UGA) boundaries of the Cities of Yakima, Selah, Moxee and Union Gap. These plans require major (affected) employers (those with over one-hundred employees) to implement programs aimed at reducing the number of single-occupant vehicle (SOV) commute trips made by their employees to the worksite.

A Yakima Valley Regional CTR plan was adopted as well as CTR plans for the Cities  of Yakima, Selah, Moxee and Union Gap. YVCOG was appointed to administer the CTR program. These plans set Single Occupancy Vehicle (SOV) reduction goals of 10% by 2011 and Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) reduction goals of 13% by 2011.

Each affected employer has an Employee Transportation Coordinator (ETC) at the worksite. The ETC is responsible for administrating the employer's CTR program.


TDM Strategies

The most obvious transportation demand strategies are those that change the way we travel to work. The first thing that many people think of is car pooling or van pooling. But don't forget other commute modes such as walking, bicycling, or public transportation.

Two less obvious transportation demand strategies are those that change the way we work. Telecommuting is when the employee works from home on one or more days a week. Alternative work schedules allow the employee to complete the "regular" work hours in less than the traditional 5 days. 


For more information on telecommuting, please refer to the new 'telework toolkit' website developed by the Washington State Department of Transportation.

Telework Toolkit Logo

(plesae note:  clicking the graphic above will navigate you away from the YVCOG webpage)


 

 

Send mail to yvcogweb@yvcog.org with questions or comments about this web site.
Last modified: 06/11/12